MEDICINES

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see chart below for doses

ACETAMINOPHEN: Acetaminophen is sold under the brand names of Tylenol, Tempra, Panadol and Actinol. Acetaminophen is a very strong but safe medicine for lowering temperature and easing pain. Acetaminophen comes in a few standard forms no matter what the brand. Acetaminophen INFANT DROPS have 100 mg/1 cc. Acetaminophen ELIXIR has 160 mg/5 cc. Acetaminophen is also available in 80 mg and 160 mg chewables, in 325 mg pills and 500 mg caplets. You will only need the INFANT DROPS for now and the correct dose is listed below. You can give acetaminophen every 4 to 6 hours as needed for pain or temperature, but the effect may only last for 3 1/2 hours. Remember, if your child is less than 2 months old and has a fever >100.5, then please call me. All infant acetaminophen drops come with a dropper that has a line at .4 cc and .8 cc. CC IS THE SAME AS ML. (also see IBUPROFEN )

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BENEDRYL: Benedryl is a antihistamine used to treat allergic reactions, itching and occasionally motion sickness. In an emergency the following doses are safe for a single use, but you should call if you notice swelling, difficulty breathing or you need to give more than one dose. Please use a syringe to measure and double check your measurement. There is only one strength over the counter ( 12.5 mg / tsp. ) ( 5 cc = 5 ml = 1 tsp. ).

COLD MEDICINES: A cold or upper respiratory tract infection is always viral. The symptoms we feel are simply our bodies response to the virus either to try to rid the body of a contagion or just to irritate us. We cannot treat the actual infection itself. Antibiotics do not work for viruses and we don’t have any antiviral drugs that work for colds yet. What we do have are medicines that try to relieve the discomfort of the symptoms of a cold. Decongestants dry up congestion, cough suppressants relieve coughs, cough expectorants moisten secretions to make coughing them out easier, and acetaminophen and ibuprofen relieve pain and fever. The safe doses of these medicines below 6 months of age ARE NOT KNOWN. Many doctors prescribe cold medicines knowing they rarely do any good and often give side effects, because we feel parents want them. That is our mistake. Parents want their child to feel better, not have a side effect from a medicine that probably wouldn’t have helped anyway. Please refer to the nasal congestion section for how you can help your child through nasal congestion and colds. As a general rule, I don’t use cold medicines until 6 months of age and then only cautiously. Please remember that colds medicines do not cure, treat, prevent or improve anything, at best they relieve symptoms, at that they do a lousy job and at worst they may result in a trip to the emergency room because of a side effect ( approximately 100,000 emergency room visits per year are due to cold medicine side effects).

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IBUPROFEN: Also known as Pediaprofen, Children’s Motrin and Advil. This is a powerful medicine for reducing fever, easing pain and fighting inflammation. The medicine has been prescription for years and finally came out over the counter for kids in late 1995. Although Ibuprofen is powerful, it is not a narcotic, not addictive and some consider it even safer than Acetaminophen. The medicine comes in several forms just like acetaminophen. Ibuprofen may be given every 6 to 8 hours and even with acetaminophen. ( 5 cc = 5 ml = 1 tsp. ).

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SIMETHICONE ( MYLICON, PHAZYME ): Please refer to the COLIC section.

ALWAYS USE A SYRINGE OR DROPPER TO MEASURE, NOT A SPOON!

Weight

ACETAMINOPHEN

INFANT

DROPS

BENEDRYL

ELIXER

CHILDREN’S IBUPROFEN

DROPS

CHILDREN’S

IBUPROFEN

ELIXER

8 LB

.4 CC (ML)

2.0 CC (ML)

0.5 CC (ML)

1.0 CC (ML)

12 LB

.6 CC (ML)

3.0 CC (ML)

.75 CC (ML)

1.5 CC (ML)

16 LB

.8 CC (ML)

4.0 CC (ML)

1.0 CC (ML)

2.0 CC (ML)